Dr. Rader, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814

Dr. Rader, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814
Dr. Rader, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 83814

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Want to Raise Inspired Kids? A Navy SEAL Commander Says Teach Them These 10 Things

Want to Raise Inspired Kids? A Navy SEAL Commander Says Teach Them These 10 Things

Executive editor of operations, Some Spider, and founder, ProGhostwriters.com
A few years ago, a retired Navy SEAL commander named Bill McRaven gave a graduation speech at the University of Texas. His words went viral, starting with his advice that no matter what you do, if you want to be successful, you should make your bed in the morning.
McRaven, who had been in charge of the mission to get Osama bin Laden in 2011, has since become the chancellor of the University of Texas System, and he's also now a best-selling author, as his book Make Your Bed topped the New York Times bestseller list.
Lauded as "a book to inspire your children and grandchildren to become everything that they can," by the Wall Street JournalMcRaven's book is a short, easy read--just 144 pages--and highly motivating. Here are his 10 key pieces of advice.

1. Start your day with a task completed.

If you want to be successful in life, start by making your bed every day.
McRaven talks about how in the grueling six-month Navy SEAL training, he made his thin bed according to his instructors' meticulous standards, and how the habit sustained him for four decades. He also talks about seeing Saddam Hussein after he'd been captured by American forces in Iraq in 2003--and noticing that he never bothered to make the Army cot in his cell.
"Sometimes the simple act of making your bed can give the lift you need to start your day and provide you the satisfaction to end it right," McRaven says.

2. You can't go it alone.

Every leadership book out there includes this advice, but McRaven has some of the best anecdotes supporting it. He talks about SEAL training again, focusing on how small teams of wanna-be SEALs were required to work together and haul a heavy rubber boat with them wherever they went.
But years after training, when McRaven was a high-ranking commander and was badly injured in a parachuting accident, he learned what this really meant, crediting all of the people who forced him to believe in himself, to recover, and to save his own career--starting with his wife and including the friends who visited him and the senior admiral who helped him navigate the Navy bureaucracy.
"You cannot paddle alone. Find someone to share your life with. Make as many friends as possible, and never forget that your success depends on others," McRaven writes.

3. Only the size of your heart matters.

I'm barely 5-foot-7, so I love this advice: It's more about the size of the fight in the dog than the size of the dog in the fight.
In his speech at Texas, McRaven talked about his respect for a very tough crew of SEAL trainees, the tallest of whom was only 5-foot-5. In Make Your Bed, he talks about meeting one of the most decorated SEALs from Vietnam--a diminutive man who was a Medal of Honor recipient and who had gone behind enemy lines many times to save downed airmen.
Before McRaven knew who the man was, he'd dismissed him in his mind because of his small size. That, he says, was a mistake: "It's not the size of your flippers that count, just the size of your heart."

4. Life's not fair. Drive on!

Often, during SEAL training in San Diego, McRaven writes, the instructors would punish students for small infractions, or even no infraction, by requiring them to run fully clothed into the Pacific Ocean, then roll around in the sand until they looked like a "sugar cookie." As a result, they'd face a very uncomfortable day, cold, wet, and sandy.
"Do you have any idea why you are a sugar cookie this morning?" an instructor who'd punished McRaven asked him once. "Because...life isn't fair, and the sooner you learn that, the better off you will be."
As McRaven writes, sometimes life just sucks through no fault of your own. The most successful among us accept it--and drive forward anyway.

5. Failure can make you stronger.

This is another one of those pieces of advice that you hear from many leadership experts, but it just has a little more oomph coming from McRaven.
He talks about how failure literally made him stronger during SEAL training, when, as a result of coming in last on a distance swim exercise, he and another SEAL were punished with an extra two hours of physical training each day.
The punishment was known as the "circus," and it was no fun. But a funny thing happened, McRaven writes: While the circus could have broken them, it made him and his fellow SEAL trainee stronger. Eventually, they were the best swimmers in their class.

6. You must dare greatly.

SEAL training included a daunting obstacle course, and McRaven talks about how he had to be willing to dive down a 200-foot "slide for life" headfirst to have any chance of finishing it in time. It was risky, and scary--but effective.
He also talks about one instance in which this same willingness to dare greatly led him to authorize an incredibly risky helicopter rescue of prisoners in Iraq. The mission was successful--but being willing to take risks means knowing you'll likely fail at least sometimes.
"Life is a struggle and the potential for failure is ever present," McRaven writes, "but those who live in fear of failure, or hardship, or embarrassment, will never achieve their potential. Without pushing your limits, without occasionally sliding down the rope headfirst, without daring greatly, you will never know what is truly possible in your life."

7. Stand up to the bullies.

McRaven talks about being scared of sharks during SEAL training--quite understandably, since the waters off San Diego, where they swam for hours each day, were full of them. Facing the sharks was just one price of becoming a SEAL.
He also talks about another experience later in his career, again after the United States had captured Saddam Hussein in Iraq. Even as a deposed despot and prisoner, Hussein managed to intimidate the Iraqi leaders who came to see him. So, McRaven ordered him isolated and humbled, so that when the Iraqi leaders met him again, they wouldn't be afraid.
"In life, to achieve your goals, to compete the night swim, you will have to be men and women of great courage. That courage is within all of us. Dig deep, and you will find it in abundance," McRaven writes.

8. Rise to the occasion.

Among other missions, Navy SEALs conduct underwater attacks against enemy ships. That requires swimming several miles underwater, "using nothing but a depth gauge and a compass to get to their target," McRaven writes.
It's scary as heck. But the true moments of rising to the occasion, McRaven writes, came later--when he was commanding soldiers and SEALs and had to watch men react to the deaths of some of their comrades in arms.
"At some point, we will all confront a dark moment in life. If not the passing of a loved one, then something else that crushes your spirit and leaves you wondering about your future. In that dark moment, reach deep inside yourself and be your very best," McRaven writes.

9. Give people hope.

McRaven talks about a SEAL training exercise in the freezing mud that pushed him and his classmates to the limits. Their instructors promised that if five students would quit, the rest of their class would be allowed to sit by a fire and warm up. Instead of quitting, he said, the students started singing, and thus inspiring each other to endure.
Many years later, McRaven recounts losing soldiers in combat--and seeing the example of a Marine general named John Kelly as he met with families of the fallen. The general's rapport with families came from his own tragedy, as his son had been killed in Afghanistan.
"Without ever knowing it, John Kelly gave all those around him hope," McRaven writes. "Hope that in the very worst of times we could rise above the pain, the disappointment, the agony, and be strong.... Hope is the most powerful force in the universe."

10. Never, ever quit!

Students in SEAL training can quit at any time--in McRaven's class, 150 students began with him, and only 33 graduated. Symbolically, students who quit are required to go to the center of the training compound and ring a brass bell three times.
On the first day of training, an instructor told McRaven and his classmates that his goal was to push them to ring that bell, but also told them: "If you quit, you will regret it for the rest of your life. Quitting never makes anything easier."
McRaven focuses on one time in particular when that lesson really became clear to him, when a 19-year-old Army Ranger under his command was wounded in combat and lost both of his legs. A year later, the soldier was still on active duty, never quitting, his prosthetic legs hidden by his uniform trousers.
"Life is full of difficult times," McRaven writes. "But someone out there always has it worse than you do.... Never, ever, ring the bell!"
PUBLISHED ON: MAY 26, 2017
https://www.inc.com/bill-murphy-jr/navy-seal-mcraven-make-your-bed-book.html
Justin Rader DDS
GenerationsDentalCDA.com

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Dental Neglect can make people sick.

Our Teeth Are Making Us Sick

Monday, February 20, 2017

Could The Paleo Diet Be Good For Your Teeth?

When it comes to diet trends, there are a few heavyweights that top the list, including the low-carb, low-fat, South Beach® and Atkins® diets. There are, however, a few others gaining speed, including vegan, slow-carb and Paleo. All of these diets have negatives and plusses, and generally speaking, most physicians advise patients to pursue a “balanced” approach appropriate to your physical makeup, habits and lifestyle. The open-ended question is: are these diets good or bad for your teeth? We’ve looked at a few others already, so let’s look at The Paleo Diet®.



What is The Paleo Diet?

The Paleo Diet takes its lead from the food consumption habits of humans who lived in the Paleolithic era – the period between about 2.5 million and 20,000 years ago. These hunter-gatherers, who lived during the period more commonly referred to as The Stone Age, lived on a diet of wild plants and animals. The Paleo Diet is modern man’s attempt to mimic that consumption pattern.

Meat, Fresh Fruit, and Veggies. What’s not to Like?

At first glance, Paleo’s recommendation to focus on lean meats, fish, fruit, and vegetables, seems like the perfect plan for healthy living. And, to a large degree, if you were to fill your refrigerator with these foods, your doctor would be pretty happy with your decision.

That said, because Paleo excludes dairy and grains, your doctor and your dentist might ask you to aim for a bit more balance once you’ve achieved any weight loss goals you might be chasing. Let’s see how the Paleo plan stacks up when it comes to your teeth. 

Positive Oral Health Aspects of a Paleo Diet

  • Fiber: We could all use more fiber, and with all the fruit and vegetables you’re going to be consuming, getting the 22-34 grams a day recommended for adults should be a breeze. Your teeth will love you for it as well, because fiber has somewhat of a detergent effect on your mouth, scrubbing away plaque and debris as you chew. This is one reason why celery is great for teeth – it’s like built-in floss!
  • Potassium: Bones (like the ones that comprise your jaw and hold your teeth in place!) love potassium, and it’s a difficult nutrient to get unless you’re consuming a ton of bananas and V-8® juice. Muscles, too, thrive on potassium, so if you’re an athlete, or just someone who likes to remain active, you’ll likely notice the boost you’re getting from higher numbers of fruits and vegetables.
  • Vitamin B-12: Thank your lean meats and fish for good numbers in this area. B Vitamins are essential for healthy gum tissue, and on a Paleo diet you’ll have no problem accumulating the recommended 2.4 micrograms a day.
  • Vitamin C: We all know Vitamin C is good for us, and once again, it’s fruit to the rescue. Vitamin C is critical in the development of collagen and healthy gum tissue and has the added benefit of keeping you free from the ravages of scurvy. Not a bad deal.
  • Low-Glycemic Carbs: Since you’ll be avoiding all sorts of refined sugars and starchy vegetables on The Paleo Diet, your teeth are going to get a break from the sticky sugars that are the primary cause of teeth decay. As we always say, what’s good for your waistline is often good for your teeth.
  • Unprocessed Oils, Nuts and Seeds: Healthy fats from olive and sesame oils, avocados, nuts and seeds protect teeth by helping them re-mineralize. When it comes to nuts, though, binge eating is a real concern – don’t eat too many if you’re concerned about your fat intake.
  • A Healthy Reliance on Water: The Paleo Diet shuns beverages that are bad for your teeth. Nut milks are okay when unsweetened, but water remains the beverage of choice for the majority of Paleos. Is water good for your teeth? You betcha. Swish it around and remove all that junk from your teeth, stimulate saliva flow, and keep that oral cavity properly hydrated!

Oral Health Concerns with the Paleo Diet

  • Getting Energy from Sticky Fruit: Carbohydrates provide the fuel our bodies need to function, and the majority of us meet those needs with grains first, and vegetables second. However, since The Paleo Diet avoids grains, and consuming the larger volumes of vegetables necessary to get the same amount of energycan prove difficult for most adherents, many opt to get their carb boost from the natural sugars in fruit.

    While this isn’t a terrible idea (fruitarians, for example, consume only fruit), many Paleo dieters rely on dried fruit – which give you energy in spades, but are bad for your teeth because they tend to stick. So, keep a toothbrush and floss handy if you find yourself overdoing it on dried fruit.
  • Excessive Fruit Acid: Lots of fresh fruit means lots of fruit acid – and, that’s bad for tooth enamel. Choose less acidic versions as often as possible, and keep a bottle of water handy to rinse between portions. Also, be sure to wait at least 30 minutes after eating before brushing. Doing so earlier can drive the acids in your mouth deeper into your teeth. Not good!|
  • Lack of Vitamin D, Magnesium, Calcium and Iron: While supplements can appear to solve just about any nutrient deficiency, any doctor or nutritionist will also tell you there’s nothing like getting your nutrition in its original package. Paleo fans will find they’re lacking in a few vitamins essential to healthy teeth and bones (not to mention an overall healthy body), and may wish to consider supplementation if on the diet long term. Please know that it can be harmful to over consume some nutrients, especially if you’re already taking a multi-vitamin, so do not supplement without consulting with your physician.
  • No Dairy: No yogurt. No cheese. No milk. No exceptions. You’ll find many arguments for and against dairy out there, and for some populations with allergies, or intolerance, it’s something that has to be avoided no matter what. The trouble for Paleo dieters, though, is without a medical necessity preventing the consumption of dairy, avoiding this entire food group does lessen opportunities for teeth to repair themselves through the natural process of re-mineralization. And while meat does play a role in re-mineralizing, dairy is by far the bigger player.
As you can see, the ancient diet of Paleolithic men and women does contain some very solid health benefits. However, it’s not a panacea. Do your homework, think smart, eat smart, and consider all of your options!


https://www.patientconnect365.com/DentalHealthTopics/Article/Could_The_Paleo_Diet_Be_Good_For_Your_Teeth


Justin Rader DDS, Generations Dental
GenerationsDentalCDA.com